This is Thin Privilege

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other-bronte:

thisisthinprivilege:

I found J.K.Rowlings quote today on Facebook and was quite happy about it. Of course the comment section was full with horrible comments.This one upsets me the most. Ableism and fat prejudice combined together =.=”

This quote is really interesting in the light of her work though, because many if not all of her fat characters display at least one of those negative qualities, and I know there have been a lot of critiques of the representation of fatness in Harry Potter. Unconscious stereotyping, maybe, which can totally exist at odds with conscious beliefs — it’s really, really easy to fall into oppressive tropes even if what they imply is at odds with what you believe.

Interesting. I’m not familiar with Rowling’s work (yes I’m THAT person who’s never read Harry Potter) but as an author I’m very interested in how the portrayal of characters can be affected by one’s prejudices, even if they’re contradicted as in this quote and hence apparently live under the author’s own radar. 
-ATL

other-bronte:

thisisthinprivilege:

I found J.K.Rowlings quote today on Facebook and was quite happy about it. Of course the comment section was full with horrible comments.This one upsets me the most.
Ableism and fat prejudice combined together =.=”

This quote is really interesting in the light of her work though, because many if not all of her fat characters display at least one of those negative qualities, and I know there have been a lot of critiques of the representation of fatness in Harry Potter. Unconscious stereotyping, maybe, which can totally exist at odds with conscious beliefs — it’s really, really easy to fall into oppressive tropes even if what they imply is at odds with what you believe.

Interesting. I’m not familiar with Rowling’s work (yes I’m THAT person who’s never read Harry Potter) but as an author I’m very interested in how the portrayal of characters can be affected by one’s prejudices, even if they’re contradicted as in this quote and hence apparently live under the author’s own radar. 

-ATL

From the Movie “Bad Words”

This is a fiction submission, from the movie “Bad Words.”

When I was in the fourth grade, I was in spelling bees.  Spelling was something I was very good at and my parents encouraged me to pursue.  I could be fat and still spell well! I did very good in my school wide spelling bee and moved on to a county wide one, and then a tri-county bee.  I was at this much bigger spelling bee with one other girl from my school, everyone else was from other schools.  I remember sitting on stage- I can still remember what I was wearing- a purple and white dress with a black sweater on. I felt confident and happy to be there.  It was exciting! I was accomplishing something! So you can imagine how I felt when the kid next to me started making comments about my weight.  We hadn’t actually started yet and were just chilling on stage. He told me that my chair had told him to come rescue it.  He said my chair was crying because I was so fat.  I got so upset.  To this day I feel like I didn’t perform my best because of that little twerp. I missed a word and at least got to get off the stage.  

Fat shaming little boy made me lose my chance at continuing my spelling career. 

Fictional Submission: Family Guy

A fictional submission from an episode Family Guy, which is typically a paragon of fatphobic BS. It’s written in the voice of one of the characters.

Thin privilege is not losing your father to society’s paradigms.

One year, our house was being renovated because of some damages, so we had to clear the whole building. My family ended up in a hotel for a while, until the renovations were done. I thought I was lucky since they have a pool (something we didn’t have at home) and I really looked forward to making the most of this time away from home.

But as anyone here knows, bathing suits are tricky territory, and more than one person made snide comments. Honestly, I felt like everyone there was looking at me and ridiculing me. I decided in that moment, after feeling so humiliated, that I’d try to lose weight.

From then I tried really hard to control what I ate and make sure I exercise, but I just couldn’t lose the weight. My father, also a larger man, suggested I might try surgical intervention and go in for liposuction. Liposuction scared me, I tried to keep with my regimen, but my dad, now taken with the idea, decided to go for liposuction himself.

It was disgusting to see the transformation as he took on his thin privilege.

His attitude changed and he became really cocky and dominant. He lapped up the attention from my mother (Oh sure you love him, just more when he’s thin right?), and started hanging out exclusively with “beautiful people”. At one point, he became so lost in his new, privileged life he even berated me for my weight. His own son!

The worst part is, nothing I did worked. I tried and tried to lose weight, to no avail. My sister called me “skinny”, in an empty attempt to comfort me, but right there in my own house my father paraded around what skinny really is.

I hate myself so much right now, and I hate that I’ve lost my father.

Special thanks to the troll who submitted this. This is from the show Family Guy. - FBP

Fat Discrimination and Thin Privilege in Fiction/Television/Movies

We’re now opening submissions to examples of fat discrimination and thin privilege in literature, television, movies, music, video games, comics, and anywhere else — as long as it’s a fictional story based on fictional characters.

The fiction and art a society creates often reflects its biases, bigotries, and institutional forms of discrimination. And since we’ve had so many troll submissions trying to use fictional stories as a way to discredit the non-fictional contributions to this blog, I figured it was time to publish stories like that for what they are: examples that support the existence of fat discrimination and thin privilege, not that discredit it. 

Rules of submitting fictional stories: 

1. Please state the name of the work and the characters that are involved in the example of fat discrimination/thin privilege. 

2. Please describe how the example is thin privilege or fat discrimination.

3. Please link to the episode/story/etc on IMBD or Wiki or some other recap site.

Any contributions that don’t follow these rules will be deleted.

Thanks, and looking forward to your contributions.

-ArteToLife

"Fictional Fat People!" Submissions By Trolls

Some troll submits:

Thin privilege is not walking into your living room at the age of 9 to discover that your mom, teachers, and friend’s parents are sitting in the room.  I was told that they were holding an “intervention” for my weight, and while I tried to explain that it was genetics, my mom brushed it off with “no, sweetie, you’re just fat.” They revealed that I would be sent to a weight management camp.  

Thin privilege is not being starved at the weight management camp, being fed only a protein bar for dinner and tofu pudding for dessert.  When I tried to escape, I was captured in an ice cream truck (fat shaming much?) and forced to come back to the terrible camp.  Eventually, I had to get myself in trouble in order to leave the camp, and I have not forgiven my mom for the experience.

Or, it’s a South Park episode. 

Which doesn’t really matter, because the reason fiction is compelling (though absurdity is often thrown in for comic relief or dramatic tension) is because it’s based on real stuff that actually happens.

So the trolls who keep submitting fictional accounts of fat characters* getting abused and discriminated against, congratulations. You’ve merely proved the point that fat discrimination is so deeply woven into our culture that the vast majority of even fictional fat characters have stories of discrimination to tell.

-ArteToLife

*Of course, the trolls think that submitting fictional accounts of fat people being discriminated against somehow “proves” that the other contributions we get are fictional or embellished somehow. This is really the extent to which they go to delude themselves that fat discrimination isn’t real — by actually engaging in the activity that they hope this blog engages in in order to absolve themselves of the guilt they feel for being hopeless fuckwads with tiny shriveled raisins for souls.


(pt.2)- in particular how much emphasis on her going through experiences posted here should show up. I would like her to be a living breathing character in our world, and pretending things like this wouldn’t happen to her is just irresponsible on a writer’s part but I know how inundating something can make things seem exaggerated. do any of the wonderful moderators here have any advice for how to write about fat characters in a way that shows their experiences without perceived exaggeration? 

This one’s write up my alley (boo! bad pun!).
For a little background: I’m currently a writer-on-the-side, not-yet-author. I’ve spent the last four years or so writing two books of literary speculative fiction. Spec fic is a great tool for learning how to write out of your experience because a lot that happens in spec fic is out of anyone’sexperience…hence the genre name “speculative.”
In my spec fic books a lot of what I write about is based on patterns in human history — religious and economic movements, for instance — but the niceties of social groups, their histories, and the world is made up. For an example of how spec fic can reflect the real world while not being explicitly about it, note that Ursula K. Le Guin’s THE WORD FOR WORLD IS FOREST was purportedly a response to the Vietnam war.
Okay. So, why bring up the spec fic stuff? Because what you do when you write realistic fiction out of your experience is similar to what I do with spec fic. In your case, instead of researching for general knowledge and carefully building a coherent speculative world, you’re going to be researching for specific knowledge and carefully build a realistic framework in which your character operates.
Okay. So you probably know that! However, this is the tricky part: What to keep and what to throw away when doing research? Like you mentioned, this blog has a bunch of different stories on it from a bunch of different people. You don’t want to just grab a handful and stitch them together — that would be sloppy (read: incoherent) and ultimately wouldn’t construct a believable framework out of which your character must operate. 
What’s the answer, in my opinion? Read, read, read, read as many of these stories as you can. Try to hear the voices of the story. Ask yourself, if I were to make up a character for each story, who would that character be? Sometimes stories detail the speaker, sometimes they don’t. Fill in the gaps. Get a sense for the people who speak here. Then you have your character — let’s call her Roxanne (Roxy). 
Who is Roxy? She’s there, standing with the other characters. Is Roxy angry, or is she sad when she hears the stories everyone else tells about their fat experience? Does she nod vigorously — “Oh my god, I thought I was the only one…”, or does she deny these experiences — “That’s not me,” she says. “I’m not a victim. I’m NOT a victim. I’m NOT!” Or maybe she’s triggered and doesn’t want to read, it’s too close to her. Then ask, why would she respond in these ways? And so, start building her background. Was it her parents? School? Friends? Lovers? Several of those or just one or two? Or maybe she had a great childhood and just got a double degree in english and communications, and has always wanted to intern on a women’s magazine. However, she keeps losing position after position to skinnier applicants, even though she knows she’s as qualified as they are, and that’s her introduction to fat stigma.What I’m trying to say is that there’s really no way to pick out a handful of experiences and sew them into a character without having to do any additional work to make that character seem real. That goes for anyone writing out of their experience. You need to read, read, read as many experiences of people in that group (in the context in which you want to write them) as you can.
If you’re afraid of copying one experience then that means you haven’t read enough. You don’t “grok” what it is to be that kind of person, yet. You can. It just takes time. It’s worth it, because once you grok it you have the ability to write characters from that perspective again and again without sounding incoherent (or offensive) — though note that you’ll never know what that other person’s going through, and might make assumptions and fuck up even when you think you’re doing it right. Which is why you want to have beta readers or people in your circle from those groups to bounce stuff off of. Of course, groups aren’t monoliths, so beware of equating the experience of one person in a group to the experience of everyone in that group.
Do it right. Writing isn’t supposed to be easy. If you feel overwhelmed or blocked that just means you haven’t done enough research yet. Listen to the voices that speak to you while you’re absorbing the experiences of other people. They should get clearer, make more sense, the more you read, and start informing you about your own character. Let your subconscious work for you. The subconscious is a writer’s best tool, imho.And yes, asking someone from that group to go over your characterization before you start letting your character walk and talk is a great idea. But there’s another important thing to remember: for all the intersections of social experiences that frame a character’s existence, there’s a commonality of human spirit that is present no matter who you’re characterizing. Shyness is shyness, pride is pride, anger is anger, love is love. Remembering the commonality of the human spirit will help you to avoid stereotyping, and give your character a Frankensteinian jolt of realism.
Anyway, I hope this helped. Happy writing!
-ArteToLife

(made rebloggable by request)

(pt.2)- in particular how much emphasis on her going through experiences posted here should show up. I would like her to be a living breathing character in our world, and pretending things like this wouldn’t happen to her is just irresponsible on a writer’s part but I know how inundating something can make things seem exaggerated. do any of the wonderful moderators here have any advice for how to write about fat characters in a way that shows their experiences without perceived exaggeration?
 

This one’s write up my alley (boo! bad pun!).

For a little background: I’m currently a writer-on-the-side, not-yet-author. I’ve spent the last four years or so writing two books of literary speculative fiction. Spec fic is a great tool for learning how to write out of your experience because a lot that happens in spec fic is out of anyone’sexperience…hence the genre name “speculative.”

In my spec fic books a lot of what I write about is based on patterns in human history — religious and economic movements, for instance — but the niceties of social groups, their histories, and the world is made up. For an example of how spec fic can reflect the real world while not being explicitly about it, note that Ursula K. Le Guin’s THE WORD FOR WORLD IS FOREST was purportedly a response to the Vietnam war.

Okay. So, why bring up the spec fic stuff? Because what you do when you write realistic fiction out of your experience is similar to what I do with spec fic. In your case, instead of researching for general knowledge and carefully building a coherent speculative world, you’re going to be researching for specific knowledge and carefully build a realistic framework in which your character operates.

Okay. So you probably know that! However, this is the tricky part: What to keep and what to throw away when doing research? Like you mentioned, this blog has a bunch of different stories on it from a bunch of different people. You don’t want to just grab a handful and stitch them together — that would be sloppy (read: incoherent) and ultimately wouldn’t construct a believable framework out of which your character must operate. 

What’s the answer, in my opinion? Read, read, read, read as many of these stories as you can. Try to hear the voices of the story. Ask yourself, if I were to make up a character for each story, who would that character be? Sometimes stories detail the speaker, sometimes they don’t. Fill in the gaps. Get a sense for the people who speak here. Then you have your character — let’s call her Roxanne (Roxy). 

Who is Roxy? She’s there, standing with the other characters. Is Roxy angry, or is she sad when she hears the stories everyone else tells about their fat experience? Does she nod vigorously — “Oh my god, I thought I was the only one…”, or does she deny these experiences — “That’s not me,” she says. “I’m not a victim. I’m NOT a victim. I’m NOT!” Or maybe she’s triggered and doesn’t want to read, it’s too close to her. 

Then ask, why would she respond in these ways? And so, start building her background. Was it her parents? School? Friends? Lovers? Several of those or just one or two? Or maybe she had a great childhood and just got a double degree in english and communications, and has always wanted to intern on a women’s magazine. However, she keeps losing position after position to skinnier applicants, even though she knows she’s as qualified as they are, and that’s her introduction to fat stigma.

What I’m trying to say is that there’s really no way to pick out a handful of experiences and sew them into a character without having to do any additional work to make that character seem real. That goes for anyone writing out of their experience. You need to read, read, read as many experiences of people in that group (in the context in which you want to write them) as you can.

If you’re afraid of copying one experience then that means you haven’t read enough. You don’t “grok” what it is to be that kind of person, yet. You can. It just takes time. It’s worth it, because once you grok it you have the ability to write characters from that perspective again and again without sounding incoherent (or offensive) — though note that you’ll never know what that other person’s going through, and might make assumptions and fuck up even when you think you’re doing it right. Which is why you want to have beta readers or people in your circle from those groups to bounce stuff off of. Of course, groups aren’t monoliths, so beware of equating the experience of one person in a group to the experience of everyone in that group.

Do it right. Writing isn’t supposed to be easy. If you feel overwhelmed or blocked that just means you haven’t done enough research yet. Listen to the voices that speak to you while you’re absorbing the experiences of other people. They should get clearer, make more sense, the more you read, and start informing you about your own character. Let your subconscious work for you. The subconscious is a writer’s best tool, imho.

And yes, asking someone from that group to go over your characterization before you start letting your character walk and talk is a great idea. But there’s another important thing to remember: for all the intersections of social experiences that frame a character’s existence, there’s a commonality of human spirit that is present no matter who you’re characterizing. Shyness is shyness, pride is pride, anger is anger, love is love. Remembering the commonality of the human spirit will help you to avoid stereotyping, and give your character a Frankensteinian jolt of realism.

Anyway, I hope this helped. Happy writing!

-ArteToLife

(made rebloggable by request)

(pt.1) I'm not entirely sure if I'm wording this right, and if I'm not, I sincerely apologize, and I won't bother you guys again. I just wanted to get some help on a character I'm writing. While I've never been skinny, for the past couple of years, I've been able to pass as just above average. This position does not give me the experience I would like when writing certain characters. One in particular really. She's a short, fat, WoC, and I wanted to ask advice on writing parts of her back story.

Asked by
wheremagicroams

(pt.2)- in particular how much emphasis on her going through experiences posted here should show up. I would like her to be a living breathing character in our world, and pretending things like this wouldn’t happen to her is just irresponsible on a writer’s part but I know how inundating something can make things seem exaggerated. do any of the wonderful moderators here have any advice for how to write about fat characters in a way that shows their experiences without perceived exaggeration?
 

This one’s write up my alley (boo! bad pun!).

For a little background: I’m currently a writer-on-the-side, not-yet-author. I’ve spent the last four years or so writing two books of literary speculative fiction. Spec fic is a great tool for learning how to write out of your experience because a lot that happens in spec fic is out of anyone’s experience…hence the genre name “speculative.”

In my spec fic books a lot of what I write about is based on patterns in human history — religious and economic movements, for instance — but the niceties of social groups, their histories, and the world is made up. For an example of how spec fic can reflect the real world while not being explicitly about it, note that Ursula K. Le Guin’s THE WORD FOR WORLD IS FOREST was purportedly a response to the Vietnam war.

Okay. So, why bring up the spec fic stuff? Because what you do when you write realistic fiction out of your experience is similar to what I do with spec fic. In your case, instead of researching for general knowledge and carefully building a coherent speculative world, you’re going to be researching for specific knowledge and carefully build a realistic framework in which your character operates.

Okay. So you probably know that! However, this is the tricky part: What to keep and what to throw away when doing research? Like you mentioned, this blog has a bunch of different stories on it from a bunch of different people. You don’t want to just grab a handful and stitch them together — that would be sloppy (read: incoherent) and ultimately wouldn’t construct a believable framework out of which your character must operate. 

What’s the answer, in my opinion? Read, read, read, read as many of these stories as you can. Try to hear the voices of the story. Ask yourself, if I were to make up a character for each story, who would that character be? Sometimes stories detail the speaker, sometimes they don’t. Fill in the gaps. Get a sense for the people who speak here. Then you have your character — let’s call her Roxanne (Roxy). 

Who is Roxy? She’s there, standing with the other characters. Is Roxy angry, or is she sad when she hears the stories everyone else tells about their fat experience? Does she nod vigorously — “Oh my god, I thought I was the only one…”, or does she deny these experiences — “That’s not me,” she says. “I’m not a victim. I’m NOT a victim. I’m NOT!” Or maybe she’s triggered and doesn’t want to read, it’s too close to her. 

Then ask, why would she respond in these ways? And so, start building her background. Was it her parents? School? Friends? Lovers? Several of those or just one or two? Or maybe she had a great childhood and just got a double degree in english and communications, and has always wanted to intern on a women’s magazine. However, she keeps losing position after position to skinnier applicants, even though she knows she’s as qualified as they are, and that’s her introduction to fat stigma.

What I’m trying to say is that there’s really no way to pick out a handful of experiences and sew them into a character without having to do any additional work to make that character seem real. That goes for anyone writing out of their experience. You need to read, read, read as many experiences of people in that group (in the context in which you want to write them) as you can.

If you’re afraid of copying one experience then that means you haven’t read enough. You don’t “grok” what it is to be that kind of person, yet. You can. It just takes time. It’s worth it, because once you grok it you have the ability to write characters from that perspective again and again without sounding incoherent (or offensive) — though note that you’ll never know what that other person’s going through, and might make assumptions and fuck up even when you think you’re doing it right. Which is why you want to have beta readers or people in your circle from those groups to bounce stuff off of. Of course, groups aren’t monoliths, so beware of equating the experience of one person in a group to the experience of everyone in that group.

Do it right. Writing isn’t supposed to be easy. If you feel overwhelmed or blocked that just means you haven’t done enough research yet. Listen to the voices that speak to you while you’re absorbing the experiences of other people. They should get clearer, make more sense, the more you read, and start informing you about your own character. Let your subconscious work for you. The subconscious is a writer’s best tool, imho.

And yes, asking someone from that group to go over your characterization before you start letting your character walk and talk is a great idea. But there’s another important thing to remember: for all the intersections of social experiences that frame a character’s existence, there’s a commonality of human spirit that is present no matter who you’re characterizing. Shyness is shyness, pride is pride, anger is anger, love is love. Remembering the commonality of the human spirit will help you to avoid stereotyping, and give your character a Frankensteinian jolt of realism.

Anyway, I hope this helped. Happy writing!

-ArteToLife

getfitmadison:

So one of my biggest problems with Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby (and I had so many big problems with the movie) was Myrtle Wilson. I think Isla Fisher did a great job, don’t get me wrong, but she was not the right person to play Myrtle.

Descriptions of Myrtle from the book:

“the thickish figure of a women blocked out the light…she was in the middle thirties, and faintly stout. Her face…contained no facet or gleam of beauty but there was an immediately perceptible vitality…”

“She had changed her dress to a brown muslin which stretched tight over her rather wide hips.”

Myrtle is not supposed to be thin or pretty (we can even go into talks about how she foils the “slender” and gorgeous Daisy but that’s not explicitly in the text) but here is Isla, definitely skinny and conventionally attractive.

This is a problem not because I need the move to exactly follow the book (although it would’ve been nice if the themes of the movie matched the themes of the book…or if the movie didn’t make the whole story into just some goddamn love story OR IF EVERY REVIEW DIDN’T CALL THEM “STARCROSSED LOVERS), but because *almost* every important female role is given to a (white) thin beautiful woman EVEN WHEN THE ROLE SPECIFICALLY CALLS FOR SOMEONE ELSE. There is not room in the “important” American stories for any other women besides skinny and gorgeous women (who are white and cis.)

Or, if we go the other route, this is supposed to be a chunky/fat/voluptuous woman (I mean she is bigger than Daisy, kinda, right?) aka the acceptable version of a thick, stout, wide hipped woman…which is another way of telling loads of women that they are too big.

When I heard they were making a move, I was excited about the casting of Myrtle, and was super disappointed when, yet again, the roles are homogenized.

There’s also a (more important) conversation that needs to be have about how Black people were used as props in the movie, the portrayal of Meyer Wolfsheim, and the use of the k-word but a) that deserves more than the footnotes of a small rant on bodies and b) it’s not exactly my place.

I’m trying to hold back from writing several long posts explaining everything that was wrong with the movie from both the lens of the book and the sociocultural perspective. It just…was so bad. SO BAD.

LIKE REALLY THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO THINK MAKING NICK AN ALCOHOLIC WHO IS WRITING THE BOOK WHILE IN A “SANITORIUM” WAS A GOOD IDEA…ARE YOU KIDDING? Nick /=/ Fitzgerald and Nick was not a fucking writer aka why are we still having the conversation where people think that the narrator of a book and author are the same thing. IT IS NOT AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY the narrator is a tool and IS NOT A FUCKING REAL PERSON.

tl;dr The Great Gatsby movie sucked and no one should like it.

Thin privilege is never having your weight described as a reason why people genuinely dislike you. I came across the following line in Kurt Vonnegut’s novel Slaughterhouse-Five: “He had been unpopular because he was stupid and fat and mean, and smelled like bacon no matter how much he washed.” I still have a lot to read, but this describes the only villain in the novel so far. He’s a rude, violent, insecure man who fantasizes about homicide and bestiality, but the main problem is his weight. 

carcinotesticle:

image

to quote Nepeta there seems to be a bit of a kerfuffle regarding fatness among trolls so i drew a simple comparison that anyone should be able to understand

on the left we have Karquius in her natural state all nice and thin on the right, we have a theoretically fat version of her and as you can tell she is just not pleasing to look at like that i bet she smells bad in that fat universe too.

from an artistic standpoint there is no reason to make a fat character unless it is for some sort of social critique and since Aranea is not really supposed to be social critique it is safe to say that she is not fat. thank you.

Thin privilege is getting to be a character and not a ‘social critique.’

Thin privilege is having “nice and…” prepended to your body size simply because it is thin.

Thin privilege is no one ever saying that from an artistic standpoint, there’s no reason to draw characters with your body.

Thin privilege is not assuming that a fictional character with your body type would “smell” simply because they are thin.

writing stories

Thin privilege is being able to envision an original character that you like without having to feel the extreme cognitive dissonance of knowing that you created this character to be thin because you can’t imagine them otherwise. Or it takes an extreme effort to even write them as even slightly obese.

I am fat and I love writing stories, but my main characters are almost always thin. I never even thought about it at first, but even stories that were basically autobiographical fiction the main character, even when supposedly representing myself, was always thin. I’m coming up with new stories all of the time, and I have gradually come to be more comfortable with writing fat main characters, but I still have to actively work at it. Of course, the fact that I’ve internalized a lot of fatphobic bullshit doesn’t help either. 

It makes me so uncomfortable to write about thin characters now because I’m always wondering if I wrote them that way due to internalized fatphobia, and a lot of times it is. I write them thin because I want them to be “pretty,” or “athletic,” even though I am very athletic myself and I know many beautiful fat women. The fact that it’s so difficult to imagine a character being perceived as beautiful or athletic while still being fat is depressing for me, because I know that it’s wrong, but I still get caught up in it sometimes and it kills me every time. 

Books…

ohhstarrrynite:

I really hate that fat characters in books are all lovable losers that are affectionately ridiculed, or lovable losers that are great for comedy relief (as they do the ridiculing themselves; haha at self-deprecation.)

Even worse, if the main character is “fat” and constantly bemoaning her “messed-up” life and her “fatness” at a size 14/16. Boo-fucking hoo.

It’s such a slap in the face, and you can’t escape it because they’re a supporting (and only sometimes a main character). Thus, it’s a repeated slap in the face. This is why I normally ready science-fiction and fantasy. I would rather just main ignorant of everyone’s body size/type.

Ugh.

redonkbadonk:

thisisthinprivilege:

Thin privilege is reading (or writing) a book and having your body type be the default image in your head for the protagonist.

It is really hard knowing that my body type is only used for villains or unimportant characters to be killed off.

My protags are usually half fatter, half thinner. :) I’m still on the ‘researching agents’ leg of my publishing journey, but hopefully in the next few years I’ll get one of my projects published and start chipping away at the paradigm.