This is Thin Privilege

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Thin Privilege is being able to play an online game without the game assuming that you’re fat because you’re poor and eat fast food.
Today I went to professional development training (I am a peer tutor) and my supervisor had one of the other tutors lead everyone in a game called “Spent” (playspent.org). The game is meant to show you how low-income workers often have to make difficult decisions regarding time and money; some of our tutees may have to make similar decisions and we have to be prepared to be flexible and understanding regarding short-notice schedule changes.
Anyway, the object of the game is to choose a job and try to hold on to as much of your money as possible for an entire month. The game throws a bunch of crazy, random scenarios at the player, where you have to act quickly and efficiently under stress.
One of our scenarios was that we were at work and “starving” and had to decide between a $6 salad or a burger from the dollar menu. The class voted we should choose the burger because we were low on cash. When we chose the burger, the prompter said (as seen in pic — I played again to get result), “Result: It may be bad for you, but it sure is cheap. Perhaps that’s why low-income workers like you are more likely to be overweight.”
Thankfully the guy playing the game for us said, “Whoa, way to make a hasty judgement!” But I thought it was completely needless to throw that “tidbit” in the game. All it will do is encourage fatphobia.

Thin Privilege is being able to play an online game without the game assuming that you’re fat because you’re poor and eat fast food.

Today I went to professional development training (I am a peer tutor) and my supervisor had one of the other tutors lead everyone in a game called “Spent” (playspent.org). The game is meant to show you how low-income workers often have to make difficult decisions regarding time and money; some of our tutees may have to make similar decisions and we have to be prepared to be flexible and understanding regarding short-notice schedule changes.

Anyway, the object of the game is to choose a job and try to hold on to as much of your money as possible for an entire month. The game throws a bunch of crazy, random scenarios at the player, where you have to act quickly and efficiently under stress.

One of our scenarios was that we were at work and “starving” and had to decide between a $6 salad or a burger from the dollar menu. The class voted we should choose the burger because we were low on cash. When we chose the burger, the prompter said (as seen in pic — I played again to get result), “Result: It may be bad for you, but it sure is cheap. Perhaps that’s why low-income workers like you are more likely to be overweight.”

Thankfully the guy playing the game for us said, “Whoa, way to make a hasty judgement!” But I thought it was completely needless to throw that “tidbit” in the game. All it will do is encourage fatphobia.

Notes

  1. articulatebitches reblogged this from fillinthe------- and added:
    I do pretty much agree with you, it can inspire fatphobia- however, the game is highlighting a real social issue. The...
  2. miss-andrie said: not to mention when the fuck will a salad make you full when you’re working hard at a minimum wage job??? literally never.