This is Thin Privilege

Scroll to Info & Navigation

Thin Privilege is having your body type appreciated at Christmas

Christmas is my favorite time of year. One of my favorite things about the holiday is that Santa Claus is one of the few fat-positive characters in popular culture. He’s strong and gentle and kind and loves children and is FAT!! 

Well, I was listening to a friend’s iPod, and a song called “Sexy Santa” by a band called Steel Panther came on. The lyrics were so incredibly traumatizing I’m having trouble typing straight. Right out of the gate, the singer yells “Santa’s getting ripped and he’s lost some weight/he’s on a low-carb diet and he’s looking great.” Other choice lyrics include “More cushion for the pushin’ don’t apply to him now/he looks hot but he used to be a big fat cow”—as though being fat is incompatible with being hot! Somehow this song manages to erase the fat identity of Santa Claus, one of the few fat characters not denigrated in general in our fatphobic culture, while also erasing fat people’s sexuality: as though fat people aren’t hot and sexually desirable. 

Thin privilege is not having your favorite holiday undermined by ubiquitous fatphobia. Thin privilege is not having your sexuality erased by fatphobic musicians. 

Body Categories

Thin privilege is easily checking a box describing your body on a dating site. Sorry, Match.com, but I’m not “curvy” or “heavyset” or “big and beautiful” (somehow this last one is the worst to me). I’m fat, but I’m also fit and athletic… but I can’t pick that, because “athletic” always comes paired with “toned,” which means thin. Thin privilege is knowing that the majority of men search for women with your body description choice.

Thin privilege is never being blamed for “wasting company money” and “making other employees unhappy” when all you want to do is cool down in Summer.

I get very overheated in Summer. It might have something to do with my weight, or it might not…but that is completely irrelevant. I am just one of those people who does not do well in the extreme heat. And yet whenever I turn the air conditioner up in my workplace, my boss accuses me of “wasting company money” and “making the other employees unhappy”. And my co-workers tell me that if I want to be more comfortable in the heat, I should just lose weight!

But here’s the thing that annoys me the most… In Winter, the thin girls in my workplace swarm to the heater. They sit in front of it for hours and block the heat from reaching the rest of the room. This caused the thermostat to break last Winter…and yet they were never accused of “wasting company money”. They were never blamed for making the other workers miserable by breaking the heater IN THE MIDDLE OF A FREEZING WINTER. They were never even told to move back to their work stations.

It’s amazing what thin people can get away with vs what fat people can get away with. Breaking a heater if you’re thin and pretty? Perfectly fine. A fat girl wanting to cool down in Summer? WELL THAT’S GOING TOO FAR! >_>

Thin privilege is going to the doctor and NOT getting tested for diabetes when you have literally none of the symptoms.

I recently visited my doctor’s because I suspect that I have a thyroid issue: I’m always cold, always tired, can’t concentrate on anything, and I’m experiencing a lot of hair loss. I’m a US size 18, and despite trying to eat healthier (I’m a vegan and I know I need to change some dietary things to make sure I’m getting the right nutrients) and starting a work out routine so I can better learn archery/martial arts, I didn’t lose any weight. So in order to get tested, I have to go in and ask for the blood test.

I told my doctor specifically what I was there for, and yet she seemed more concerned about my cholesterol levels than anything else and started asking me pointed questions about symptoms that I recognized as diabetes symptoms. I said I wasn’t experiencing any of those and because I’m vegan I’m not worried at all about getting too much cholesterol, but she still put an order in for them to test my cholesterol levels (though she told me I didn’t have to come back another day and fast beforehand). It was like she was determined to prove that I must have high cholesterol/am in danger of getting diabetes because I’m fat.

I get back my cholesterol results as well as the other blood test results in the mail? And it’s the only one she made a comment on: “Great job! Keep it up!” because, as I knew it would be, my cholesterol levels were in the normal range despite not even fasting first before having the test done.

(Oh, and the thyroid was on the low end, so now I’m seeing a naturopath who actually listens to me for my other symptoms.)

I don’t really know how to phrase this in a thin privilege sort of way, but I saw something that actively kinda pissed me off earlier. In Supernatural S9E08, Sam and Dean go to a chastity support group as part of their investigation. One of the women in the group is fat. After the meeting while they are talking to some of the people who were present, the larger woman is seen in the background at the snack table taking some cookies. At that point the camera actually zoomed in to show that she was wrapping up six cookies into a napkin and placing them in her purse, at which point the group leader excused herself to go stop said fat woman.

It was never brought up again, and the character was not seen anywhere else in the episode. She literally just existed for a “lol fatties hoard all the junk foods!” moment. Totally ripped me out of what is normally one of my favorite shows.

This is not strictly tied to the topic of your blog, but I wish people would stop preaching eating "right" everywhere. It implies that food can be right or wrong (usually, it's "right" because it helps you lose/maintain weight, as opposed to being more or less beneficial to our body). As someone who's suffered from ED for 6 years, I find it not only triggering, but I also know how dangerous having this idea can be. Or the idea that eating certain types of food is a sin b/c you need to be thin.

Asked by
sinfulgod

Diet Coke or Regular?

I’m a thin person myself but have a few larger friends. I have noticed that when it comes to ordering drinks, specifically coca-cola,sprite etc people don’t seem to bat an eyelid if i choose sugar-free or regular. However it seems that regardless of what option my larger friends go with they get judged, if they choose regular full fat, waitresses will bring back diet acting like they won’t notice. If they chose diet people tend to laugh and ‘roll their eyes’ and comment ‘it’s not working love’(a middle-aged man on the table next to us actually said that). Thin privilege is not having your diet ridiculed, regardless of what route you go down, healthy or not. They are damned if they do and damned if they don’t.

Thin Privilege is not having to worry about finding new places to shop after moving.

I hate the clothes is mass stores. Target, Wal-Mart. They all make me feel and look so frumpy even though I’m on the lower end of the plus-size scale. I carry all my weight in my hips and legs, so my jeans range from size 14-18 (on bad bloated days) and I get so crazy self conscious that I tend to leave most stores empty handed and cry in my car. I just moved to Florida and I’m surrounded by malls with shiny stores and pretty clothes that will never look as good on me as the mannequin.

Thin Privilege is not leaving a store in near tears because you were so relieved to find a Torrid (ONLY plus-sized BEAUTIFUL clothing. Look them up!) in a nearby area. My boyfriend probably thinks I’m crazy after that but I don’t care. I hate feeling like I should hide the tags on my clothes because God forbid someone know the size I wear. I can’t handle that happening.

Thin Privilege and dresses

This weekend I decided to purchase a new maxi dress from the AX Paris curve range. I have a couple of different prints already and I like the fit and quality, however there are a few things that have really upset me.

1. The curve range is severely limited compared to the straight size range (however I acknowledge that its great this brand even does a plus size range compared to other brands that were established as straight size brands). AX Paris release approx 2 to 3 prints per year of the dress I like in the curve range, there are at least 10 in the straight size range at this time.

2. None of these particular dresses in the curve range are available on the brand website, they can only be found on selected 3rd party supplier websites. A thin person can go to one place to find the full collection, however a larger person has to shop around and hope they find the style in the suppliers they are able to find.

3. The cost for the thin person is lower. The dress I bought here is £42.00 plus shipping. The same dress on the brand website is currently on sale for £19.99 and the usual full price is £35.00. So my sister (who is straight sized) decided she liked it too and bought the dress for £22.01 less than me (so she could have bought two for roughly the same price as me buying one). I understand the concept of more fabric = higher cost. However this only makes sense if you only compare the biggest sizes to the smallest. Without taking into account the sale, a UK 16 pays £12 more (being forced to buy from the 3rd party supplier) that the UK 14 (able to buy from the brand website) when there’s only a 3ins difference in those two sizes. If fabric were really the issue wouldn’t each size pay incrementally more?

The same is true of the rose print version Curve Range £45.00 Straight Size £30.00. 

I realise these are different websites and actually the size 12 and 14 are also available from the 3rd party supplier at the inflated cost but the thin person at least has the option for the lower price. Another supplier that stocks a print from the curve range also charges £42.00. Again these are not available on the brand website.

Thin privilege is having a wider choice in one easily accessible place for a lower cost

This has really opened my eyes, and I'm glad for that. Sometimes I feel fat, but... I'm five four and 130 lbs. I'm really not. I don't deal with all this bullshit. I have a privilege I didn't even know about. Sorry people suck. You guys are rad

Asked by
beautydancingwiththebeast

I am 13 years of age, 4'11 and 155 pounds! I had been growing up as an overweight kid all my life in a middle class family. I get fed healthy food, I am on the school's volleyball team, I ride my bike out of boredom, I hike with my friends and I walk to and from school. I have bigger parents and it may be genetics. But no, people who weigh a few more pounds are automatically stupid, lazy, careless, gluttons that are "glorifying obesity" and "thin shaming". *sigh* I really like your blog though.

Asked by
stonecoldcrazy-yaknow

There is a friend of mine that upsets me greatly every time we talk, because she always has to make weight an issue. She´s a cosplayer and was talking about other cosplayers that annoyed her. She talked about two incidents, one was about a group of girls standing around bookstore, which I fastly shrugged off. When talking about the other incident she started to change her language. How? She started out with describing their bodies, telling me in great detail how fat they were and that their clothes were to slutty for people with that much weight on their bones. She got on with how those two girls were kissing and more fatphobia and slutshaming followed. She was annoyed of those two because they dared to share affection and being dressed a little less, while being fat. 

I got deeply offended by that and asked her, why their bodies did matter in that case and she said she would start any description with how a person looks. I pointed out that she did not say anything about the bodies of the group of girls she talked about before. She hastily replied “Well yeah, they were thin!”. 

She ended her defense with “I was raised that way”. I told her, that she should maybe question the way she was educated. That ended the conversation. She also always tries to defend herself by saying that she dated bigger women in the past (I don´t know if she´s still dating the girl she was before), but at the same time she says that she would not date a women to big. 

I don´t really know how to deal with this anymore. I like her, but what she says makes me sick. 

Hm…

So I was watching the first episode of Drop Dead Diva because my friend recommended it to me. I was, however, a little disgruntled by the fact that the first time you meet the lawyer—an intelligent, pretty ‘overweight’ (the show’s blurb’s word choice) girl—is when she’s reaching into a fridge, right past a grapefruit and straight for a cinnamon roll. She bites into it and makes a big show of how much she’s enjoying it. Contrary to that choice of breakfast, the thin and perfect girl who [quote] has never been more than a size two [unquote] (even though she looked more than a two to me….) was eating grapefruit. 

Could that get any more insulting or stereotypical? Because she’s fat, she HAS to be eating a cinnamon roll, and she HAS to make faces while she eats it because she’s enjoying it SO much. 

Reading your blog has called to my attention these kinds of things, things I perhaps wouldn’t have noticed before. The stories featured on here are heartbreaking but I’m hoping that due to the bravery of the individuals who have shared their stories, more awareness will spread. This sort of stereotyping shouldn’t even exist, but unfortunately it does. 

mightymikemcgee:

WhenWeSayYES We Can Build the World’s Most Powerful Radical Self-Love Website!

I have grown up with body image issues all my life. #WhenWeSayYES is a beautiful campaign and fundraiser developed by my friend Sonya Renee Taylor and the folks at The Body Is Not An Apology. It’s helping me and thousands of people to see our own beauty and to be unafraid to show it and much, much more. They’re fighting to bring voices and ears to the things we just don’t talk about and especially the topics we surpress. TBINAA is constantly under fire from trolls and nasty folks who just don’t want to see them succeed and to be accepted. Check it out! Support it however you can and spread the word.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE AND TO SUPPORT THIS CAUSE

The Body Is Not An Apology on Tumblr
And on Facebook
Get to know Sonya Renee TaylorAnd spread this tag: #WhenWeSayYES

mightymikemcgee:

WhenWeSayYES We Can Build the World’s Most Powerful Radical Self-Love Website!

I have grown up with body image issues all my life. #WhenWeSayYES is a beautiful campaign and fundraiser developed by my friend Sonya Renee Taylor and the folks at The Body Is Not An Apology. It’s helping me and thousands of people to see our own beauty and to be unafraid to show it and much, much more. They’re fighting to bring voices and ears to the things we just don’t talk about and especially the topics we surpress. TBINAA is constantly under fire from trolls and nasty folks who just don’t want to see them succeed and to be accepted. Check it out! Support it however you can and spread the word.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE AND TO SUPPORT THIS CAUSE

The Body Is Not An Apology on Tumblr
And on Facebook
Get to know Sonya Renee Taylor
And spread this tag: #WhenWeSayYES