This is Thin Privilege

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Many EP studies tautologically assert that widely held social values are… well, widely held. Study finds that most men are attracted to women who are deemed conventionally attractive by society!

This one if for all for those people claiming that men find thin women sexy because they’re healthier. 

1) Evo-psych has basically no evidence behind it, because it rests on the premise that our society’s tendencies are universal to humanity throughout history — something that can be trivially disproven for most of these claims, since there are many societies that have different tendencies, and periods throughout history when they’ve been different.

2) No, thin women are not actually healthier than fat women. We’ve posted about this over and over again. Search the archives, search the internet, it’s fact.

3) Societal preferences about weight have varied massively over history and across the world, and are trackable as social trends. If it were a genuinely evolutionary adaptation, this would not be true.

4) You cannot actually know what someone’s health is like by looking at them. Period. Not only true of fat people, true of everyone. Very thin people who are assumed to be anorexic or ill may actually be very healthy. Likewise very fat people. Likewise any physical trait.

5) You do not actually understand how evolution works.

-MG

So one day, on facebook, someone said “I always wanted to see a pin-up calendar, but with people who look like me” and a bunch of other people agreed and a discussion started about how we should actually make our own. And this is what happened.
We just finished our last photoshoot (a Pride theme for the month of June!) and we are trying to raise funds for the printing of the calendar. We were hoping you would help us get the word out that people can pre-order the calendar at our Indiegogo crowdfund and that would help us make the calendar a reality. And of course, spreading the word is the next best thing!
Our group is planning on this calendar being just the beginning of many body positive and fat activist projects we create. We’re already talking about the 2016 calendar, offering free classes/seminars on make-up, fat fashion and body positivity, having branches in other cities and so much more.
If you would even consider posting this for us, we would be honored. Thanks for your time and all that you do!
http://igg.me/at/pudgepdxpudgepdx.tumblr.com
www.pudgepdx.com

So one day, on facebook, someone said “I always wanted to see a pin-up calendar, but with people who look like me” and a bunch of other people agreed and a discussion started about how we should actually make our own. And this is what happened.

We just finished our last photoshoot (a Pride theme for the month of June!) and we are trying to raise funds for the printing of the calendar. We were hoping you would help us get the word out that people can pre-order the calendar at our Indiegogo crowdfund and that would help us make the calendar a reality. And of course, spreading the word is the next best thing!

Our group is planning on this calendar being just the beginning of many body positive and fat activist projects we create. We’re already talking about the 2016 calendar, offering free classes/seminars on make-up, fat fashion and body positivity, having branches in other cities and so much more.

If you would even consider posting this for us, we would be honored. Thanks for your time and all that you do!

http://igg.me/at/pudgepdxpudgepdx.tumblr.com

www.pudgepdx.com

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion


  People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.
  
  Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”
  
  “We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.
  
  Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.
  
  As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.
  
  But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.
  
  The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
  
  According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.
  
  Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.
  
  “Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.
  
  UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.

Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”

“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.

Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.

As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.

But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.

The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.

Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.

“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.

UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

(via madmaudlingoes)

As a chubby girl who was hospitalized for anorexia while still being kinda chubby, I can say thin privilege is so real. I worked out and dieted everyday for years and still wasn't thin. When I was hospitalized by doctors for anorexia, non-medical personal doubted I actually had an eating disorder because I wasn't thin. This is my natural body weight. I will never be thin. Ever. It is not something I will ever "earn." I was dying and people didn't think my illness was real because I wasn't thin.

Asked by
livingofftheclassics-deactivate

sheluvsbball:

thisisthinprivilege:

hivebent-trash:

madgastronomer:

hivebent-trash:

thisisthinprivilege:

(Sorry this is so long but I think it’s important)
I never noticed the lack of representation for bigger girls in music until now. And it’s annoying. I have never seen a chubby girl in a music video. Not even in the background.

Not only is it annoying, but it’s unrealistic. The average music…

Meghan Trainor
Nicki Minaj
Iggy Azalea
That’s all I’m going to say

All of whom are still not actually fat, are acceptably thin, and do not use actual fat women in their videos or advocate for actual fat women, just for slightly larger ones than the very very thin ones normally shown in music videos. Not that three examples would be any kind of real counter to a claim of underrepresentation. Try harder.

You aren’t even fat, you have some pudge here and there, what’s the difference between your “fatness” and Megan Trainor’s or Iggy Azalea’s or even Nicki Minaj’s fat ass? I mean honestly, you should just stop while you believe you’re ahead. And by the way, thin privilege is a fucking lie sweetheart. Don’t throw a temper tantrum because your too damn lazy to lose weight.

Not even fat? Have you seen me? I’m 5’1” and a size 20, with a BMI of 44 — what they used to call “morbidly obese”.

The difference is that they don’t actually experience most of the negative social impact for being fat. Having wide hips and large ass and a narrow waist is very much admired in some parts of North American culture, and generally people who have that build are not subject to the same kind of hate, nor are they as likely to experience medical discrimination and a few other forms of discrimination. My big belly, fat ass, fat thighs, fat upper arms, and fat everything else isn’t much admired at all. There are not whole songs about how much more awesome my body is that the bodies of models (not that I particularly want that; my body is awesome and does not require comparison to anyone else’s, and I do not need to hear someone put down thin people to feel good about my body; yeah, nor you’re going to claim that I make fun of thin people, too; save yourself some time and go find some examples, because all you’ve got are random assertions with nothing to back them up). There most certainly are songs like that about their bodies, and they’re some of the ones singing them.

Thin privilege and fat discrimination exist on a spectrum, sure, but women who are shaped like that definitely do not come in for the raft of shit that much larger women do.

And now you retreat into randomly telling me to lose weight, because you really are nothing but a troll, after all. Shame. I thought we could have an interesting conversation about representation.

-MG

I have to disagree with the bolded, specifically if these features are on black women, then it’s met with lots of hatred and judgment. Just read the comments under Nicki Minaj’s video, they’re horrible.

But the hatred and discrimination of fat women in mainstream or music videos is more common than any type of body discrimination I’ve experienced.

I admit, I consciously skipped over the entire racial dimension to all of this. I did not feel like I could address it adequately.

Yes, black women’s bodies are always under much stricter scrutiny than white women’s, and even more so than white women’s will be criticized for any conceivable thing, including things that are praised on white women. Because misogynoir. I’m going to leave it there, because if I try to say something else, I will inevitably say something badly wrong. If anyone else would like to take up examination of the intersection in question, I’ll reblog it.

-MG

hivebent-trash:

madgastronomer:

hivebent-trash:

thisisthinprivilege:

(Sorry this is so long but I think it’s important)
I never noticed the lack of representation for bigger girls in music until now. And it’s annoying. I have never seen a chubby girl in a music video. Not even in the background.

Not only is it annoying, but it’s unrealistic. The average music…

Meghan Trainor
Nicki Minaj
Iggy Azalea
That’s all I’m going to say

All of whom are still not actually fat, are acceptably thin, and do not use actual fat women in their videos or advocate for actual fat women, just for slightly larger ones than the very very thin ones normally shown in music videos. Not that three examples would be any kind of real counter to a claim of underrepresentation. Try harder.

You aren’t even fat, you have some pudge here and there, what’s the difference between your “fatness” and Megan Trainor’s or Iggy Azalea’s or even Nicki Minaj’s fat ass? I mean honestly, you should just stop while you believe you’re ahead. And by the way, thin privilege is a fucking lie sweetheart. Don’t throw a temper tantrum because your too damn lazy to lose weight.

Not even fat? Have you seen me? I’m 5’1” and a size 20, with a BMI of 44 — what they used to call “morbidly obese”.

The difference is that they don’t actually experience most of the negative social impact for being fat. Having wide hips and large ass and a narrow waist is very much admired in some parts of North American culture, and generally people who have that build are not subject to the same kind of hate, nor are they as likely to experience medical discrimination and a few other forms of discrimination. My big belly, fat ass, fat thighs, fat upper arms, and fat everything else isn’t much admired at all. There are not whole songs about how much more awesome my body is that the bodies of models (not that I particularly want that; my body is awesome and does not require comparison to anyone else’s, and I do not need to hear someone put down thin people to feel good about my body; yeah, nor you’re going to claim that I make fun of thin people, too; save yourself some time and go find some examples, because all you’ve got are random assertions with nothing to back them up). There most certainly are songs like that about their bodies, and they’re some of the ones singing them.

Thin privilege and fat discrimination exist on a spectrum, sure, but women who are shaped like that definitely do not come in for the raft of shit that much larger women do.

And now you retreat into randomly telling me to lose weight, because you really are nothing but a troll, after all. Shame. I thought we could have an interesting conversation about representation.

-MG

so i understand all the abuse fat/obese people go through, but why call this blog "this is thin privilege" instead of something like "this is fat abuse"? (not that exactly, that sounds really stupid.) the stuff written here isn't about privilege, its about how society treats fat people. its not like white privilege or male privilege or something like that. i just think a lot of the hate and abuse this blog receives would stop if it weren't about "thin privilege", but fat hate.

Asked by
rhayae

emotionsforsocialjustice:

thisisthinprivilege:

[Continued - ok ignore that last ask maybe, i read the faq. but still, it aint privilege. its advantage. they’re not the same thing :/]

You just defined privilege. Privileges are “unearned advantages.” Regardless of why someone is thin society gives them unearned advantages due to the discrimination and hatred fat people experience. Naming the blog this is thin privilege acknowledges those advantages and doesn’t allow for thin people to deny how they benefit from fat hatred. Telling us to call the blog “this is fat abuse” is telling us to stop emphasizing how thin people are also impacted by fat hatred and directly benefit from it.

We’re not sweeping this under the rug anymore or letting thin people think they can ignore what we go through.

-FBP

What this blog actually does is make a mockery of the body acceptance and self love movement. Self love is taking care of yourself, exercising and eating right. Body acceptance is loving the healthy you. You take all of your problems and pin point them onto thin people, as if we caused your shitty adittude. -the hyper one

This reblog goes out to all the people who don’t understand that “body positive” doesn’t include all bodies. This is the bullshit we get.

-MG

[tw: eating disorder, depression, doctors, fat shaming]

A few weeks ago I went to my psychiatrist to get my medication refilled. They commented on my recent weight loss, stating that it was “good”. I told them that it was not good, as I had been starving myself due to being severely depressed the past month. He then said, and I quote, “That’s good. As long as you loose the weight.”

submitted anonymously

Google isn’t really helping me & the tag is too full for me to find something but I was wondering if you guys know anything about 5 seconds of summer and fat shaming? One of my close friends really likes them and she’s gonna see them at one of the Pasadena shows and we bought her a meet and greet with them as a bday surprise and now I’m worried. If you don’t know/end up publishing this can you do it on anon? She also follows you.

Mod Response:

Never heard of them. Anybody?

-MG

I think being fat is an earned disadvantage and that being thin confers no privilege on an individual. Much like felons have the earned disadvantage of being viewed poorly and with suspicion by society due to their past decisions. Non-felons do not have privilege over felons. The way felons are viewed is deserved.

You guys are like criminals talking about the “privilege” that non-criminals enjoy.

On a case by case basis a felon might redeem themselves in the eyes of those they know, and prove through their personality and ethic that they have shunned their old ways and are intent on improving themselves, but to fault society for viewing felons in a bad light is in error. In the same way a fat person might show that they really do eat a healthy amount and exercise enough and yet can’t seem to lose weight but are making an effort, thus redeeming themselves in the eyes of those around them, but when seeing a random fat person it is not wrong to judge them a social delinquents or deviants.

To the point, as a general rule I think it is correct to admonish and castigate fat-ness as being an indicator that a person makes unhealthy lifestyle choices which harm themselves and larger society, and that obesity should be discouraged and fought. I believe your premise, that thin people enjoy some unearned advantage that fat people do not, is false. The truth is fat people are at an earned disadvantage and thin people are just treated normally.

What say you guys?

________________________________________________

Moderator response:

Are you actually comparing fat people to criminals, and being fat as a behavior along the lines of committing a crime that necessitates redemption?

Proof in point that the War on Fatness is a moral panic (or really, a moral crusade) and has nothing whatsoever to do with concern over a person’s health. 

Thanks for stating the case of the anti-fat moral crusaders so clearly. I mean, us fat folks suspected that y’all just thought we were inferior, evil, ignorant, etc all along, but it’s great to get such straight-up confirmation without concern-based smoke-blowing.

Note that’s unnecessary for me to argue with you point-by-point if I reject your premise, i.e., that fatness is immoral or in anyway comparable to committing a crime. I don’t, ergo, fuck you and your disgusting worldview.

-ATL

(TW sexual harassment)

Thin privilege is not being regularly sexually harassed throughout adolescence.

At my middle school, it was socially acceptable by students and staff alike for the school bullies to “scoop” the DMAB fat kids. In other words, you sneak up behind the person, cup their boob in your hand, and flick it up so it bounces and jiggles, to the amusement of everyone but your victim.

I was one of those victims; my breasts have always been the part of my body I’m the most insecure about, and I only recently realised that this era of terror contributed to that enormously - especially given my boundaries and gender identity today.

It was sexual harassment, and it could be done in front of staff and faculty without any recourse. I’m sure it still goes on at that godforsaken school today.

Let's look at this from a different point of view than "lose weight if you don't want trolls". People see you as an easy target. You flip your shit when someone, god forbid, challenges you. There are people who are genuinely bullied for weight issues, there are people who aren't bullied for weight issues, and then there's you. Let's not kid ourselves, you don't want equal rights. You want a "fatriarchy", so to speak. However, kicking and screaming when you don't get your way doesn't cut it.

Asked by
heliocentrismx

Yes, again with the ‘fatties want to enslave the thins’ (“fatriarchy” har har) rhetoric.

Are you really serious? You can’t have possibly thought out the logical conclusions of your position.

The concept that people shouldn’t be treated badly for looking differently isn’t really disputed among people who think about the issue for more than five seconds. Where the dispute over fat comes in is subtle, but powerful: it’s a “second-hand” argument. That is, that somehow me looking this way has some kind of tangible effect on someone else, therefore I should stop. This is utter nonsense, of course, or is attributable to some higher-level social structure (like private and government insurance that socializes risk with the risks of being fat as opposed to having other physical characteristics widely overplayed by the industry, probably because it’s socially acceptable to do so).

Fundamentally, from an ethical point of view, if my being fat has nothing whatsoever to do with you, then you have no right to comment on my or others’ fatness. Which is why so many people trot out the “health” trope: because, ethically, “concern” is seen as an acceptable vehicle for commentary (because it is painted as good-intentioned), and also because “health” in general is being (wrongly) used as a synonym for “public health.” 

Reactionary behavior (lacking in reflection or reason) isn’t a feature of the authors of this site or its supporters. We’ve had plenty of time to reflect on our situation. Rather, panicky, knee-jerk reaction has been a feature of those who troll this site.

You are, quite frankly, proof of that statement.

-ATL