This is Thin Privilege

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Positive story: I've had eating disorders my whole life due to fatphobia I face. Today, I realized that no matter how thin or fat I was, when I love my body, it was not for its size. Yes, I'm fat. And I'm the strongest girl I know. And I love that.

Asked by
apuppycalledkitten

Anti-fitness

sir-whirl:

goddamnitriot:

the-exercist:

thisisthinprivilege:

I don’t agree with anyone saying that thin =/= fit. There is a very good reason there are no fat athletes. I guarantee no Olympian participating in an athletic sport of any kind cares more about winning than personal image. So they do what’s best to be the best. Which leads to them being more fit and therefore not fat. Being able to do what the average human can do is not “fit”.

(mod note: OOPS EXCEPT FOR FAT OLYMPIANS.

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Holley Mangold

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Sarah Robles)

Oscar Brayson and Ricardo Blas Jr!

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Leisel Jones!

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God on Earth, Reese Hoffa!

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Chiara Rosa!

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Jillian Camera-Williams!

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Vanessa Zamboti!

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And there are so many more. Olympians, every last one of them, and in better shape than I am. 

#sports#olympics#thanks#thANK U#i’ve been trying to find fat athletes but it’s really hard to stomach what people say about them#like i would find these lists#aND EACH ONE WAS TALKED TO AS IF THEY WERE LESS OF A PERSON#and some kind of joke#’hahah there are fat people who are fitter than you#as if it’s such a strong thing#and they just talk down to fat athletes in ways that they would never otherwise#it annoys me sooo much!#sO THANK YOU FOR MAKING THIS POST

Speaking as a qualified PT, on the first day of college we were taught that someone’s weight has no relevance whatsoever to their fitness level.

People need to stop being so damn ignorant.

Bringin’ it back.

Love you folks. For everything you do.

These tone policing arguments are those I received from my abusive family as well. If I couldn’t articulate what I was saying about how they hurt me *just right* they would turn it around to be all on me. But there was never a just right. I learned that it was far safer and easier to take whatever they had to say and not stand up for myself to even explain how I was feeling about it. It cowed me into submission and allowed the abuse to continue and worsen.

I am angry though, because the position that emotionally charged language weakens your argument is exactly what I was taught in university as well. Even high school. We were taught that emotionally charged language erodes the speaker’s validity and ultimately point. 

I never realized how much of a systemic tool that was to help discredit oppressed groups at the time. It hadn’t even occurred to me and since using emotionally neutral language lessened the abuse I’d suffered than if I tried to contest it, I bought into it.

While I haven’t in a long while now, your blog helped reinforce how bullshit that whole concept is. And how absolutely oppressive the perpetuation of it is. Sometimes I feel like I’m wrong. Perhaps my bio-fam is right, after all their mentality was pretty much brought up in university courses. But that’s not the case and you help me remember that. 

Thank you all so much.

You do a lot of good in my life. Much love!,

Pom

What do you mean fatphobia and fat shaming

Asked by
Anonymous

keepursulafat:

fumbledeegrumble:

keepursulafat:

gaiusthegenius:

this is actually a documented thing, in children’s literature especially. Allow me to draw your attention to page 85 of Exploring Children’s Literature (2nd Edn.) by Nikki Gamble and Sally Yates:

stagdogwolfandrat:

Idk, I always felt the HP series had a lot of fat phobia in it. A lot of the ‘not nice’ characters were fat. Dudley and Vernon Dursley for instance. There were several parts in the books where Dudley was mocked for his weight. Peter Pettigrew was fat too. ‘Fat’ seems to be associated with ‘bad’, but not the suave kind of bad. Not the ‘bad’ like Draco Malfoy or young Tom Riddle, who are seen as bad guys, but you’re not meant to be disgusted by them. You’re meant to be fascinated by them. In a strange way, they’re still respected as villains (not saying Draco is a villain, but you get my point right?). That doesn’t happen with the fat characters though. They’re either meant to be laughed at, or you’re meant to feel disgusted by them.

"A criticism levelled at Roald Dahl, and more recently JK Rowling, is that a character’s worth is associated with their physical attributes. Augustus Gloop and Dudley Dursley are presented as being inherently unpleasant and their fatness is inextricably bound up with personality."

"…a character’s worth is associated with their physical attributes."

"…[unpleasant fat characters’] fatness is inextricably bound up with their [bad] personality."

So much truth.

This is why I’m rolling my eyes at the majority of the villain worship on this site. Fit people and thin people get the handsome, suave ones. We get the slavering dump trucks, knuckle-cracking henchmen and dumb, fat bullies.

You all get Loki, we get Dudley. They never make fat Lokis.

And I’m sorry if you all think I sound like a broken record, but I’m going to keep talking about it because I’m constantly reminded of it every time I scroll down my dash. I am so tired of having so few characters to admire or relate to, even with the villains.

That’s very true - fat villains are never meant to be seductive, appealing or evilly attractive, and if they are shown somewhat in that light it’s meant to be a joke like “hahaha look at this fat villain thinking they’re sexy.”

Furthermore, after seeing your remark about people not making any fat Loki’s, I couldn’t help but google a bit and check if that’s true. Turns out, people do make fat Lokis……. they just look like this:

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[tw: dieting, weight loss, eating disorders, “thinspiration”, healthism]

This article [https://uk.lifestyle.yahoo.com/blogs/icymi/-thinspiration—backlash—well-deserved-or-political-correctness-gone-too-far-130047278.html] was on the front of my homepage today:

What is more, Richman’s main critic, a woman called Amber Sarah, has publically labelled herself “a fat activist.”

While she didn’t deserve to be called any names, we’re not convinced that the body image she advocates is any healthier than the one she is attacking.

Shaming someone for their use of the “thinspiration” hashtag, while lauding physiques that are obese by medical standards, doesn’t seem entirely logical.

Thin privilege is dismissing and demonising Fat Activism as “illogical, “unhealthy body image” and “attacking” and “shaming” of thin bodies in a single throw-away paragraph in an article promoting a healthist agenda.

Here is the abstract of the study. The psychologists who performed it used psychopathy to describe behaviors and attitudes, not as a diagnosis. Their word, not mine. I’m sorry I used sociopathy, since it was incorrect, but I’m gonna have to stick by psychopathy.

Last word on that.

But if the only thing about that post you find worthy of comment is the use of psychopathy, and not the harassment of someone who submitted here, then I suggest to you, not that you ignore ableism, but that you pay attention to more than one thing at a time, because actually doxing people (and even fake-doxing people) is some serious shit.

haunt-my-miles:

thisisthinprivilege:

Careful out there, folks. These astonishing scumbags are “doxing” (really just googling their tumblr names and finding what other sites they’re on, not genuinely doxing) people for being our followers.
-MG

Sociopath as a general term can be taken as ablest as these people most likely do not have the antisocial personality disorder and the specific subset named after sociopaths. V_V
Cause technically — other than in this disorder — sociopaths do not exist and using the term otherwise is bad.

Well, as a matter of fact, I was referencing  a study. Misquoting, as it turns out, because the study said psychopathy and not sociopathy, but no, I was in fact using it in a technical psychological sense.

haunt-my-miles:

thisisthinprivilege:

Careful out there, folks. These astonishing scumbags are “doxing” (really just googling their tumblr names and finding what other sites they’re on, not genuinely doxing) people for being our followers.

-MG

Sociopath as a general term can be taken as ablest as these people most likely do not have the antisocial personality disorder and the specific subset named after sociopaths. V_V

Cause technically — other than in this disorder — sociopaths do not exist and using the term otherwise is bad.

Well, as a matter of fact, I was referencing a study. Misquoting, as it turns out, because the study said psychopathy and not sociopathy, but no, I was in fact using it in a technical psychological sense.

Careful out there, folks. These astonishing scumbags are “doxing” (really just googling their tumblr names and finding what other sites they’re on, not genuinely doxing) people for being our followers.
-MG

Careful out there, folks. These astonishing scumbags are “doxing” (really just googling their tumblr names and finding what other sites they’re on, not genuinely doxing) people for being our followers.

-MG

decembercat:

thisisthinprivilege

is having your parents not shame your least harmful coping mechanism. 

I have pretty severe Complex-PTSD and all of my coping habits are pretty shit. In order of least harmful to most they are: eating high fat/high sugar foods, hate reading potentially triggering things, smoking cigarettes, getting high, and getting really drunk. 

My mom absolutely detests smoking and doesn’t want me to smell of it at all, ever. So you’d think she’d be okay with me eating chocolate bars instead. But instead she makes comments about how I don’t really need to eat that and that I should watch my weight and be healthier instead. My dad will also join in. 

Or she’d try to blame my depression on my sugar intake, which has been pretty high since forever. So logically, that’s not going to be the thing that magically makes recent depression vanish.

I eat okay. But I exercise all the time. I do roller derby, so that’s 5 hours a week of skating and drills. I don’t have a car so I bike everywhere. I’m in better shape than most people. If I add running, I’m going to be in the best shape since high school. 

But clearly the worst thing I’m doing to my body is eating things. 

I’m also a really small fat. Like I’m 5’3, around 175-180ish lbs. But my body carries fat extremely well and I build muscle pretty fast, so people usually think I weigh 40-50 lbs less than what I weigh. 

All my therapists and psychiatrists are not worried about my weight at all (as it’s stayed stable for the last year) and are, obviously, much more concerned about my anxiety, Complex-PTSD, and depression. So I guess I’m really lucky. 

Thin privilege is having your parents take your mental distress and disorders seriously instead of suggesting diet changes or presuming they know better than your psychiatrist. 

Thin privilege is having your parents not shame you for your best coping mechanism. 

(I placed food as least harmful because it does not lead to possible panic attacks, like hate reading does, because panic attacks definitely lead to more harmful thoughts than the candy bar that I’m definitely going to burn off later in the week.)

Thin privilege is not having men start conversations with you for the sole purpose of attempting to use you for their own sexual gratification (regardless of whether or not you want it), and then calling you fat when you refuse to participate.

[12:47 AM] chatwithu4evr: If you had a son and caught him looking at nude pics - take web away? ignore?
[12:47 AM] h———-: you’ve asked me this question literally dozens of times over the course of the previous six months.
[12:47 AM] h———-: i’m not sure what part of “I’M NOT INTERESTED IN HAVING THIS CONVERSATION WITH YOU”
[12:47 AM] h———-: isn’t getting through to you.
[12:49 AM] chatwithu4evr: its ok u r kinda fat anyway
[12:49 AM] chatwithu4evr: haha fat cunt
[12:50 AM] chatwithu4evr has left the chat.

Fat Shamed By Employer

I’ve been fat ever since I can remember. I was a larger girl when I was young and I was bullied nonstop. It didn’t get better as I got older, it only gets worse.

I applied for a job at a large fortune 500 tech company and was asked to come in and interview. I have over 5 years of experience in the field and am a near expert at what I do.

The other interviewees for the position were all sat outside the system architechts office. 4 of the other 6 applications were also people of size. 5 female and two male. The men were both skinny. We all went in and interviewed one at a time.

The interviewer made passive agressive remarks about my weight and how the company will need to accomodate for me. I acted professinal and chose to ignore the remarks. The interview went well other than the fatphobic jokes. I was told if I met their requirements, which I aced, I would be given a call within 48 hours.

It was only 3 days later that I realized what had happened. Everyone of the interviewees met the qualifications for the position. We all went above and beyond when it came to our requirements. They interviewed us all to see which one of us best fit their “ideal” look for a systems manager. I was absolutely outraged.

They purely based their decision off of who “looked the part”. It was a fairly public position, meaning many meetings with investors and occasional public appearances at company events.

I was so angry at these fat phobic assholes for choosing a employee completely based off looks.

Thin privilege is having a SHOT of even getting a job.

Thin privilege is not being judged as a possible employee based only off of your looks.

[tw: ed]

I have always been on the thinner side and unfortunately never really paid attention to thin privilege. That was until I became pregnant with my first child. I was blessed to have a healthy and happy pregnancy. Over the course of the nine months I put on about 50+ pounds, a bit more than what was recommended but my OBGYN never said anything negative about my weight gain. So everything was great until I went to the hospital to deliver my baby. The first time I saw my delivery room nurse, she literally looked me up and down, smirked and said I needed to step on the scale. On that day I weighed 198lbs. She commented multiple times on how heavy that was and asked if I had always been heavy or if I just ate too much during my pregnancy. I sheepishly responded that I gained more weight than I intended too. She scoffed and said it was going to very difficult for me to get back to a “normal” body weight. I was too overwhelmed by being in labor that I didn’t say anything to her. But I was extremely self conscious for the rest of my delivery. The day after my delivery, I was weighed and due to having an IV overnight, I only lost one pound. The nurse (a different nurse!)  who weighed me told me that after she gave birth to her son she immediately lost 20 pounds and wore her pre-pregnancy jeans home. It made me like a big fat failure. And I kept up with this self hate for the first few months after my daughter was born. I wasn’t one of those women who lost her baby weight in 6 weeks so I really struggled with my body image and would find my self starving myself and then trying to work out.  I would cover the mirror in the bathroom before I showered because I was so ashamed of my body. It got to the point where I was beginning to resent my baby because my pregnancy gave me this body. My family also added to this cycle of self hate. Every time I saw them and had lost a few pounds they praise me for starting to look like myself again and ask me what my secret was. (Uhm I was pregnant and now I’m not…). They were trying to be supportive but I felt that I wasn’t myself until I reached a certain number on a scale. And it was even worse if I went a few weeks without losing any weight. I would get comments like “you know everyday that goes by its just going to get harder and harder..” or “well I lost x amount of weight in that time frame, are you sure you are cutting enough calories?” And the absolute worst was when they would mention a certain celebrity that maintained their weight throughout their pregnancy and how 6 weeks after giving birth they now had a six pack. Thankfully, I had a very supportive husband who never once criticized my weight and helped me develop a healthier approach to body. I was fortunate enough to break this cycle of self hate and through a much healthier approach I lost some (not all!) of my pregnancy weight. I am no longer obsessed with losing weight and I now prefer my softer post pregnancy body.

This whole ordeal really opened my eyes on how fat shaming runs rampant in our society and unfortunately how common and how accepted it is in the medical community. My ordeal only lasted for about year so I can’t imagine how hard it must be to spend your whole life having these negative attacks thrown on you. I am also thankful that blogs like this exist because they are huge eye openers for people that have never faced body shaming. I wish that I would have paid more attention to thin privilege and fat shaming  prior to this event. But now I know the hard truth and will continue to educate myself on these issues and will do everything in my power to preach body acceptance and be a positive role model for my young daughter.

Free/Cheap Clothing

As a thin person but fat-positivism ally I just realized another privilege of mine I haven’t found on any lists so far: Thin privilege is rarely having to buy new clothes because you fit into old ones of relatives and friends they have grown out of. Plus, easily finding clothes that fit at give-away shops, flea markets and secondhand shops. I try and compensate them in some manner or other even if they don’t want/accept money. I was also thinking of accompanying others to events with a variety of sizes but I’m reluctant to ask as I’m not sure how they’ll feel about it.